Sarasota Sheriff’s Office to Receive Heroin Medication

More and more reports seem to be flooding the news regarding the ongoing fight against the heroin epidemic that has struck much of the country. Heroin is becoming a larger and larger issue in the United States due to the easy access (and frequently unnecessary prescriptions from doctors), the high chance for addiction and abuse, and the high price involved in getting pills. As heroin becomes more and more prevalent, and rates of addiction go up, governments across the board (both at the state and federal level) are working hard to both stem the tide of addiction, as well as provide the necessary treatment and guidance for those who need it.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's Office announced Friday that they received a donation of 800 doses of naloxone, a drug that stops the effects of an opioid overdose and saves victims from death. KATE IRBY/Bradenton Herald

The Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office announced Friday that they received a donation of 800 doses of naloxone, a drug that stops the effects of an opioid overdose and saves victims from death. KATE IRBY/Bradenton Herald

The Sarasota Sheriff’s Office is going to be the first law enforcement agency in Florida to receive funding from a new law that is aiming to fight heroin on a series of levels. This new law will allow officers to administer medication to people who are overdosing on heroin and other opioids and drugs. The officers have received 800 doses of EVZIO — an auto-injector of naloxone, which immediately stops the effects of a heroin or opioid overdose upon injection — in a donation from the manufacturer of the drug, Kaléo. The donations amount to about $320,000 and the drug is both easy to use and provides no harmful side-effects to people who aren’t overdosing but have been injected by accident.

With 99 deaths due to opiate overdose in 2014 and a much higher number expected for 2015, these drugs and the training officers will receive will be truly life-saving. While the drug won’t cure addiction (it will only help fight overdoses), it will allow victims to survive, recover, and give them more time with their family and loved ones, increasing the chance that they will enter a treatment program. This is the perfect example of laws cutting through bureaucracy and finding bipartisan support for a cause that is obviously in need of tackling. Hopefully the price for individual doses of this medicine will decrease (it’s still high and preventing other counties from taking advantage of this law) so that more doses can be used to save more lives.

If you’d like to read more, the link is here.

from Derek Byrd’s Law Blog Derek Byrd’s Latest Law Blog Post http://ift.tt/1jmvPBm

Australian Data Retention Law Begins

We live in a world where both people and governments are becoming more and more paranoid about each other and their neighbors every day. Over the past few years, we’ve seen how the international political community has been rocked by the leaking of intelligence data regarding the NSA and the US government spying on both friends, its own civilians, and foes. While it’s an unspoken acknowledgement that all countries spy on each other regardless of relations, the US broke the cardinal rule of not getting caught. Now, as this sense of technological paranoia continues to grow, a new Australian law aimed at data retention and surveillance has begun today.data retention

This newest law is proving to be controversial to say the least. It requires telecommunication companies to to hold on to metadata for 2 years, allowing the Australian government to access said data for security purposes. The companies would hold on to data including who called or texted, the amount of data sent/time spent on a call, the locations, the device used, the email IP data, and more. Holding on to this information would allow the government to access it easier and use it to pursue national security interests and concerns. With the rise of extremism and terrorism in all aspects of society, this sort of data can be used to learn about and prevent attacks of any sort before they begin.

As anyone can expect, this new law has been proving very controversial in Australia since it was first brought up. While the government claims that the law is necessary for protection from terrorism, both domestic and external, privacy activists and other citizens are claiming a breach of privacy and the possibility for racial and religious profiling. Along with claims of the law demanding too much information for crimes that are both major and minor, another concern is that a warrant is no longer needed to request any of this information.

If you’d like to read more, the link is here.

from Derek Byrd’s Law Blog Derek Byrd’s Latest Law Blog Post http://ift.tt/1jmvP4m

Can You Sue For Death Or Injury Of Your Pets?

The Judge's Chamber: Law Blog

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There are many people out there that are animal lovers and want to know if they sue for death or injury to their pets. If your pet in injured or dies, you can get monetary compensation. However, this can only happen if you file a criminal charge for cruelty to animals and the perpetrator is caught and convicted. The court may then decide to grant compensation for economic loss a part of the punishment. You may also receive compensation if you file a civil lawsuit. This should be done with the help of a lawyer. You may also file a lawsuit in small claims court. These courts are designed to be user friendly and less complicated, so you can file a lawsuit without a lawyer.

Can You Sue For Death or Injury of Your Pets

One of the things you should bare in mind is that even if you win…

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Congressional Update and Roundtable Discussion with Vern Buchanan

Sarasota Chamber Buzz

A feature by Kevin Cooper, Vice President of Public Policy for The Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce.

On a recent afternoon in September, over 40 key Chamber members and community leaders participated in a luncheon and roundtable discussion with United States Congressman Vern Buchanan. Not only does Buchanan represent the area’s interests in Washington, D.C., but he is a Longboat Key resident and former Chairman of the Board for The Chamber. Not long after seeing the President sign his Veterans Identification Card Act into law, Buchanan was in the area to share his thoughts and focus for the near future.

IMG_5702Earlier in the day, Buchanan met with a number of tax professions who represent corporations of all sizes. The Congressman shared with The Chamber group how he would like to see the tax code significantly simplified. Specifically, the length and complexity of conformity, he contended, is both challenging…

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Watch for me on Fox4 News Tonight at 10 p.m.

crimcourts : A Criminal Law Blog

North Port parents Joseph Walsh and Kristen Bury North Port parents Joseph Walsh and Kristen Bury

I spoke with Fox4 News this afternoon for a story she is working on regarding the mysterious disappearance of a 9-week old baby from North Port. Specifically, we talked about how the challenges of the case, and how hard to prosecute the case if there is only circumstantial evidence… especially if the State decides to pursue homicide charges, though no body has been found at this time. So far, they have only been charged with child neglect, but that is very much subject to change as more evidence comes in, and the prosecutor reviews the case. It is a terrible tragic case that will likely be a major story for some time to come.

Here’s the Fox4 Website: http://www.scrippsmedia.com/fox4now

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